Frequently Asked Questions

COMMONLY ASKED QUESTIONS FOR NEW COMFORT SYSTEMS

It is 40 degrees (or colder) outside and I notice my heat pump making a really loud noise outside?
Heat Pumps provide both heating and cooling for your house. When it is 40 degrees or colder, your outdoor coil will freeze when the moisture in the air comes in contact with it. To deal with this, your unit has a defrost cycle in which it thaws out the outdoor coil. The loud noise you are hearing in the morning or on cold days is most commonly your system in that defrost cycle. It should last for several minutes at a time as often as your outdoor coil needs it. Also, check to see what kind of refrigerant your system uses. Most likely it is R-410A. R-410A runs at much higher pressure than R-22, which is most likely what you had in your old system. This also contributes to your system noise level in its defrost cycle. One way that you can help reduce the noise is if your system has a "Compressor Blanket". If you purchased an Optimum or a Premier system, your system already has one. If you purchased a Budget, Basic, or Deluxe system, your system did not come with that option, and can be purchased for your system by calling one of our Customer Care Representatives.
I see smoke rising from my outdoor unit when it is cold outside. Is my unit on fire?
No, your unit is most likely in its defrost cycle. That smoke is actually steam from the melting ice. It should stop in about 5-10 minutes. It is common to see this several time in just one hour on extremely cold days.
What does it mean when "CFS" flashes on my thermostat?
CFS means "Call For Service". It is just a friendly reminder to get your system serviced on a regular basis. Sometimes, when a maintenance is performed on your system, the service technician might have forgot to reset the thermostat. To reset, call one of our friendly Customer Care Representatives and they will explain how to reset your thermostat.
Why is my unit running all the time? Won't it run up my electric bill?
Your systems size was determined using formulas that tell the designer how much heat your house gains on a 95 degree day and how much your house losses on a 20 degree day. That means, when it is 95 degrees outside or hotter, or 20 degrees or colder, your system will be running constantly to remove or add the heat your house needs to stay comfortable. It is perfectly normal for your system to run constantly on extreme weather days. On extreme weather days, you will be using more electric, but that only accounts for about 8% of your systems run time in a typical year.
I had an oil/gas furnace and now I have a heat pump. Why is my heat pump air feel cold even though my thermostat says it is the right temperature in my house?
Many of our clients have switched to energy efficient heat pump systems because it is the most energy efficient way to heat and cool your house in this climate. However, for some who have become accustomed to warm gas or oil heat, the transition can be difficult to a heat pump's heat. Your body temperature is approximately 99 degrees. Your old oil furnace put out approximately 125 degree air, which felt warm to your touch because it was 26 degrees warmer than your body temperature. Your gas furnace put out approximately 115 degree air, which was 16 degrees warmer than your body temperature. Your new heat pump, however, puts out approximately 95 degree air, depending on the outdoor temperature. When you put your hand over the register when your heat pump is running, it feels cold because your body temperature is around 99 degrees. It is still warmer than the temperature you want your house to be, but it feels cold to the touch. Now, if your electric heater, which every heat pump has, turns on because it is really cold outside, then your heat pump puts out approximately 115 degree air as long as the electric heater is running. However, this does use more electric than your heat pump.
Why does my new system have a funny burning smell the first several times I turned my unit to heat?
When your system first switches to heat for the first several times, there is some residue oil on the electric heat as well as on the evaporator (indoor) coil. When it is in heating, sometimes you are smelling that oil burn off. If it does not subside within 7 days, call our Customer Care Representative.
I have Indoor Air Quality Products (UV Light) and I smell something funny coming from the vents. What is it?
Sometimes, our Indoor Air Quality Products produce small amounts of Ozone (depending on the type of Indoor Air Quality you have). Some are sensitive to Ozone, and if you continue to notice the smell, call our Customer Care Representative.